mothernaturenetwork
mothernaturenetwork:

The moss carpet brings a little green into your bathroom in an unconventionally natural way. This living bathmat features three types of green mosses that grow in a decay-free, recycled latex foam. Because moss flourishes in damp, humid places, the bathroom is the ideal location for the moss carpet — even the green-thumb challenged can keep it alive!Check out some more bizarre green inventions.

mothernaturenetwork:

The moss carpet brings a little green into your bathroom in an unconventionally natural way. This living bathmat features three types of green mosses that grow in a decay-free, recycled latex foam. Because moss flourishes in damp, humid places, the bathroom is the ideal location for the moss carpet — even the green-thumb challenged can keep it alive!
Check out some more bizarre green inventions.

unconsumption
unconsumption:

Here’s a skeptical take on “single stream” recycling:


But this process is, ultimately, more expensive than sorting things before they got to the dump, and MRFs can’t separate recyclables quite as well as a system that never mixes them together to begin with. Glass is a particular problem, as the Container Recycling Institute explains:
Glass is the material most affected by the amount of breakage in each type of collection system. In single-stream programs, it is virtually impossible to prevent glass from breaking as it goes to the curb, is dumped in the truck, gets compacted, gets dumped on the tipping floor of the MRF, is repeatedly driven over by forklifts, and is dumped on conveyor belts to be processed by the MRF.
All of this broken glass means that not as much gets recycled—and that sometimes it contaminates other recyclables, like bales of papers. One of the main criticisms of single-stream recycling is that it’s led to a decrease in quality of the materials recovered (which matters for the people who buy bales of recycled material and turn it into new products).

The rest is here: Single-Stream Recycling Is Easier for Consumers, But Is It Better? - The Atlantic

unconsumption:

Here’s a skeptical take on “single stream” recycling:
But this process is, ultimately, more expensive than sorting things before they got to the dump, and MRFs can’t separate recyclables quite as well as a system that never mixes them together to begin with. Glass is a particular problem, as the Container Recycling Institute explains:

Glass is the material most affected by the amount of breakage in each type of collection system. In single-stream programs, it is virtually impossible to prevent glass from breaking as it goes to the curb, is dumped in the truck, gets compacted, gets dumped on the tipping floor of the MRF, is repeatedly driven over by forklifts, and is dumped on conveyor belts to be processed by the MRF.

All of this broken glass means that not as much gets recycled—and that sometimes it contaminates other recyclables, like bales of papers. One of the main criticisms of single-stream recycling is that it’s led to a decrease in quality of the materials recovered (which matters for the people who buy bales of recycled material and turn it into new products).

The rest is here: Single-Stream Recycling Is Easier for Consumers, But Is It Better? - The Atlantic

unconsumption
unconsumption:


UK supermarket giant Sainsbury’s has now created the first outlet in the country to be powered solely through food waste.
Collaborating with waste recycling company Biffa, the company has developed a facility close to its Cannock, West Midlands store that has enabled it to leave the grid completely. Like many other supermarkets, the outlet marks down any fruit and vegetable products at the end of the day if they’re no longer good to sell.
However, if they’re still not sold they’re handed over to charitable organizations that can still use it, or used to create animal feed. If it’s not suitable for any of that, the food waste is picked up from a nearby Sainsbury’s depot by Biffa, which uses its anaerobic digestion facility to turn the waste into electricity. A 1.5km cable is then used to send the energy — enough to power day-to-day operation of a store — back to the Cannock outlet.

(via Supermarket store is entirely powered by food waste | Springwise)

unconsumption:

UK supermarket giant Sainsbury’s has now created the first outlet in the country to be powered solely through food waste.

Collaborating with waste recycling company Biffa, the company has developed a facility close to its Cannock, West Midlands store that has enabled it to leave the grid completely. Like many other supermarkets, the outlet marks down any fruit and vegetable products at the end of the day if they’re no longer good to sell.

However, if they’re still not sold they’re handed over to charitable organizations that can still use it, or used to create animal feed. If it’s not suitable for any of that, the food waste is picked up from a nearby Sainsbury’s depot by Biffa, which uses its anaerobic digestion facility to turn the waste into electricity. A 1.5km cable is then used to send the energy — enough to power day-to-day operation of a store — back to the Cannock outlet.

(via Supermarket store is entirely powered by food waste | Springwise)